Interesting Articles & Videos On Science From All That Is Interesting

Why Don’t We All Have Cancer?

Given the incredible amount of work our body does every day and its constitutive cellular processes, it’s absolutely amazing that we don’t get cancer starting when we’re born. Find out why that is by watching this video.

Great News, Caffeine Addicts: Science Says Coffee Is Good For You

Drink 2-3 cups of coffee a day and don’t have a ruinous diet? Studies show you’ll live longer than those who don’t and decrease the likelihood of contracting Type-2 Diabetes. Watch on for more pro-coffee facts to throw at people who say you have a “problem”.

4 Of The Most Evil Science Experiments Ever Performed

Scientists are heroes. At their best, scientists represent the best in humanity—intelligence, curiosity, and skeptical rigor. This perceived goodwill licenses scientists to do things in society that ordinary people wouldn’t be allowed to get away with. If a random person burst into your house with a bubbling test tube and shouted “Quick! Drink this!” you’d call the police. Put that person in a white lab coat, though, and you’ll only delay long enough to thank him for coming in the nick of time.

Scientists are human, however, and it turns out that human beings who’ve been given that level of trust almost always prove themselves the last people in the world who should be trusted to look after a goldfish. Here are 4 of the most appallingly evil experiments ever carried out in the name of science. Note that many of the experiments were of limited or non-existent value. It turns out that freaks who like to torture human beings are generally bad at designing double-blind trials.

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The Hubble Flickr Stream Is The Most Stunning Thing You’ll See All Week

Hubble In Space

Source: NASA

Before Galileo turned his telescope to the skies in 1610, all that we knew of the universe we knew because we could see it with our naked eyes. Little did we know what wonders they hid from us. Galileo’s work sparked a revolution in science and astronomy, and while he may have made vast improvements on the telescope of his day, NASA’s 24,000 lb. space telescope has collected over 100 terabytes of data since its launch in 1990. A large number of these images have been curated to the Hubble’s Flickr stream. They give us an exciting glimpse into what those of Galileo’s time were missing, and what we, too, could miss if we don’t pay attention.

And if these images leave you yearning for some video footage, fear not: we’ve got you covered with the most important image Hubble has ever captured.

Hubble Flickr Homunculus Nebula

Source: Flickr

Huge clouds of matter – known today as the Homunculus Nebula – consist of byproducts from the binary star system Eta Carinae, which experienced a supernova impostor event in 1843. This is the closest star system to Earth which could experience true supernova status in the near future. (The near future in space-time could still mean a million years from now.)

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