What War? Twentieth Century Japan’s Views Of The Future Were Impossibly Bright

Imagine a world where robots reared your children, and wars were waged underwater. Add a splash of nostalgia, a touch of Jules Verne and super-saturated hues, and you’ve got the “future” according to Japanese retro-futurists. The movement roughly spanned from the 1930s to the 1960s, which covered a series of protracted conflicts and transitions for the island nation. And while none of the futurists’ depictions of reality actually came into being, we can’t help but revel in the way technological innovations can inform views on what the world has to offer.

Propeller powered trains, 1936: Could be seen as a forerunner to the high speed rail systems in use today in metropolitan areas around the world.

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Sick Of “Smart” Phones? This Short Doc Is For You

In “Phone Life”, documentary filmmaker Ivan Cash explores the social dimensions of owning a smart phone in one of the United States’ tech capitals: San Francisco. Following two characters, a young, smart phone-obsessed girl and a tech designer who’s never owned a cellphone, Cash questions the worlds we create and deny thanks to the emergence of “smart” technology. Definitely a “first world problem”, but a problem nonetheless.

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Futuristic Food: Print, Grow, Eat, Repeat

These days, 3D printers can create just about anything, from human organs to musical instruments to dinner. That’s right, dinner. With the correct ingredients and a certain level of skill, chefs are creating all kinds of 3D-printed food. Yet nothing compares to “Edible Growth,” a futuristic food concept from Chloé Rutzerveld that begins as 3D-printed dough-soil, and grows into a fresh, nutrient-rich edible.

Delicious 3D Printed Food

Source: Softpedia

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Giuseppe Randazzo Blends Art & Technology With Ease

Thinking about how many hours it would take you to even come close to assembling the artwork above? For Italian artist Giuseppe Randazzo, 3D printing made it all worlds easier. In a totally unique exploration of art, science, technology, coding, architecture and nature, Randazzo created these fun stone patterns using computer programming and three-dimensional printing techniques. Let’s just say he’s at the forefront of utilizing technology to create some seriously intriguing art.

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