Fascinating Articles About The United States

Nixon’s “Thumbs Up” Resignation

Nixon After Resigning 1974

Following a series of scandals that devastated a vulnerable nation along with the ambitions of a less-than saintly presidential administration, Richard Nixon said sayonara to the Oval Office on August 9, 1974.

Straight from the pages of future President George H.W. Bush’s journal:

“There is no way to really describe the emotion of the day. Bar [Bush’s wife, Barbara] and I went down and had breakfast at the White House. Dean and Pat Burch and the Buchanans were there in the Conference Mess. There was an aura of sadness, like somebody died. Grief. Saw Tricia and Eddie Cox [President Nixon's daughter and her husband] in the Rose Garden – talked to them on the way to the ceremony.

President Nixon looked just awful. He used glasses – the first time I ever saw them. Close to breaking down – understandably. Everyone in the room in tears.

The speech was vintage Nixon – a kick or two at the press – enormous strains. One couldn’t help but look at the family and the whole thing and think of his accomplishments and then think of the shame and wonder kind of man is this really. No morality – kicking his friends in those tapes – all of them. Gratuitous abuse. Caring for no one yet doing so much. When he used the word ‘plumbers’ [in his speech] meaning it [as] ‘laboring with his hands’, the connotation was a shock to me.”

11 U.S. Products That Are Banned In Other Countries

What do ketchup, baby walkers and mullets all have in common? All are traditionally “American” goods, and all are banned in various parts of the world.

How War Changed Abraham Lincoln

First And Last Portrait Abraham Lincoln President

Beginning his term as president three months after South Carolina became the first state to secede from the Union, it is impossible to know if Abraham Lincoln could foresee the pure carnage that awaited him and the nation. Over 600,000 deaths later, the war’s effects are plainly seen on Lincoln’s face.

Innocent Mentally Handicapped Man Released From Prison After 31 Years

Yesterday morning Henry Lee McCollum was released from prison in Raleigh, North Carolina after spending 31 years behind bars for a crime he did not commit.

Henry McCollum Released From Prison

McCollum hugging his step mother, Priscilla McCollum, upon his release from Central Prison in Raleigh, N.C.
Source: New York Times

In 1983 Mr. McCollum and his half-brother, Leon Brown, were coerced by police into confessing to the rape and murder of an 11-year old girl. They quickly recanted, but the conviction stuck. It took 31 years for DNA evidence to exonerate the mentally disabled brothers. In the United States, an estimated 5% of all black adult males are currently incarcerated, while less than 1% of white adult males are locked up.

Had the Center for Death Penalty Litigation, a nonprofit legal group in North Carolina, failed to take his case, Mr. McCollum would have been executed. Many argue that executing a person with a mental disability violates the Eighth Amendment of the United States Constitution which states that a court cannot inflict “cruel and unusual punishment.” Mentally handicapped people in the United States are regularly subjected to the death penalty, often for crimes they’re not guilty of.

Henry McCollum Released From Prison Capital Punishment

According to Amnesty International 140 countries worldwide have abolished the death penalty.
Source: Wikipedia