Grand Jury’s Decision To Drop Case Against Ferguson Police Officer As Unusual As It Is Upsetting

Protests in Ferguson, Missouri

Source: USA Today

On Monday, November 24th, 2014 a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri declined to indict Darren Wilson, the police officer who shot and killed an unarmed teenager, Mike Brown, this past summer. The decision to drop the case against Wilson has sparked thousands of protests across the nation.

This case is notable for more than its highly publicized nature: it’s also incredibly unusual for a grand jury to decline to return an indictment. In 2010, U.S. attorneys prosecuted 162,000 federal cases, and only dropped 11 (16%) of them. According to University of Illinois law professor, Andrew D. Leipold, “if the prosecutor wants an indictment and doesn’t get one, something has gone horribly wrong… It just doesn’t happen.” As former New York state Chief Judge Sol Wachtler famously stated, a prosecutor could persuade a grand jury to “indict a ham sandwich.” There is one notable exception to this rule–when the accused is a police officer.

Furgeson's Grand Jury failed to indite WIlson

Number of cases federal courts declined to prosecute are in red. Source: Washington Post

The alarming trend of grand juries dropping cases against police officers is not unique to Ferguson, but a nationwide issue stemming from a systematic lack of officer accountability. According to Michael Bell, retired Air Force lieutenant colonel and the father of a 21-year-old Wisconsin man who was handcuffed and then shot in the head at point blank range by a police officer, “if police on duty believe they can get away with almost anything, they will act accordingly.” Thanks largely to the Bell family, Wisconsin became the first (and currently the only) state which requires outside review of all officer-involved fatalities.

Even if positive social or political change comes out of Mike Brown’s death it won’t happen quick enough to change this week’s decision, and questions surrounding the case still remain. Jurors didn’t need to believe, beyond a reasonable doubt, that Wilson had committed a crime. All they needed for an indictment was to feel that there was probable cause. There were multiple eye-witnesses who claimed Brown raised his hands in the air, and irrefutable evidence that Wilson fired at the unarmed teen ten times, so why was the case against Wilson dropped?

The History of Voting in America

Following the Supreme Court’s decision on the 2013 Shelby v. Holder case–which withdrew the requirement that jurisdictions with a history of discrimination against minority voters get approval from the feds before changing voting laws–and the subsequent addition of voter identification laws in many states, it appears that even as we make new leaps toward equality we’re going backward when it comes to voting rights. But that’s nothing new. In the Oxford Companion to American Law, Grant M. Hayden explains: “The history of voting in the United States has not been characterized by smooth and inexorable progress toward universal political participation. It has instead been much messier, littered with periods of both expansion and retraction of the franchise with respect to many groups of potential voters.”

Voting History Election Day

A reenactment of an election day from the pre-Revolutionary period at Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia
Source: History

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Miss Perfect Posture, 1956

Miss Perfect Posture 1956

Good posture has long been associated with confidence, power and physical beauty. In the mid 20th century, most interest in posture remained on the latter. The entrants in “Miss Perfect Posture” were to stand on a pair of scales, with one foot on each, which would register her weight. If both scales showed the same weight, that meant that the woman had correct standing posture. This, along with the entrants’ beauty and X-rays (we’re wondering how radiation exposure might affect posture), was considered in choosing the Miss Perfect Posture winners.

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