Powerful Images From Fast-Food Worker Strikes

For the past two years fast-food workers around the world have been asking for two things: $15 per hour and the right to unionize without retaliation. The movement began in New York City, but it quickly spread across the Midwest, Pacific Northwest, and even through the historically anti-union South.

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Fast Food Workers Protest Las Vegas

Fast food worker, Kris Varrette, is arrested at a Las Vegas protest. Source: Business Insider

fast food workers protest

Burger King employee Keisha King, 23, in Atlanta. Source: Mashable

Fast Food Protests Michigan

Jada Williams, 18, is arrested in Flint Michigan. Source: The Guardian

fast food workers protest

Source: NBC News

fast food workers protest

More than 100 fast food workers and dozens of other protesters were arrested during peaceful protests outside McDonald’s corporate headquarters Oak Brook, Illinois Source: Google

Stick together for $15 and a union

Source: SEIU

fast food workers protest

Long John Silver employee Antwon Brown, 31, in Atlanta. Source: AOL

Fast Food Workers Protest Chicago 2

Protest in Chicago. Source: Business Insider

Fast Food Workers Protest Chicago

Tyree Johnson is arrested at a Chicago Protest. Source: Daily Herald

fast food workers protest

Protest outside of a Phoenix McDonald's Source: Boston Herald

Fast Food Workers Protest South Florida

Source: CBS

Fast Food Workers Protest New York City

Workers block a street in TImes Square Source: Business Insider

Fast Food Workers Protest Tokyo

Fast-food workers from 33 countries around the world, including Japan, joined the strikes. Source: PRI

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Their argument is that $7.73 (the average hourly wage for a fast-food worker) is not a living wage. The median fast-food worker is about 28-years-old, and more than a fourth of those employed by fast-food chains have children. 70% work part time with something called “zero hour contracts.” This means employees are not guaranteed a set number of hours during any given week, and can be penalized with hour reduction for refusing to stay late or work on a day off, calling in sick, or participating in protests. This makes workers extremely dependent on their employers, as well as vulnerable to exploitation.

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What do ketchup, baby walkers and mullets all have in common? All are traditionally “American” goods, and all are banned in various parts of the world.

How War Changed Abraham Lincoln

First And Last Portrait Abraham Lincoln President

Beginning his term as president three months after South Carolina became the first state to secede from the Union, it is impossible to know if Abraham Lincoln could foresee the pure carnage that awaited him and the nation. Over 600,000 deaths later, the war’s effects are plainly seen on Lincoln’s face.

Innocent Mentally Handicapped Man Released From Prison After 31 Years

Yesterday morning Henry Lee McCollum was released from prison in Raleigh, North Carolina after spending 31 years behind bars for a crime he did not commit.

Henry McCollum Released From Prison

McCollum hugging his step mother, Priscilla McCollum, upon his release from Central Prison in Raleigh, N.C.
Source: New York Times

In 1983 Mr. McCollum and his half-brother, Leon Brown, were coerced by police into confessing to the rape and murder of an 11-year old girl. They quickly recanted, but the conviction stuck. It took 31 years for DNA evidence to exonerate the mentally disabled brothers. In the United States, an estimated 5% of all black adult males are currently incarcerated, while less than 1% of white adult males are locked up.

Had the Center for Death Penalty Litigation, a nonprofit legal group in North Carolina, failed to take his case, Mr. McCollum would have been executed. Many argue that executing a person with a mental disability violates the Eighth Amendment of the United States Constitution which states that a court cannot inflict “cruel and unusual punishment.” Mentally handicapped people in the United States are regularly subjected to the death penalty, often for crimes they’re not guilty of.

Henry McCollum Released From Prison Capital Punishment

According to Amnesty International 140 countries worldwide have abolished the death penalty.
Source: Wikipedia