The Creepiest Places on Earth

Dolls

Stuffed animals strewn about Jazzland Source: Free York

Certain places on Earth are best left alone. Whether they have been made by nature or by man, these locales can scare the hell out of you. This, bizarrely, is what makes them so appealing to certain people in the first place. We enjoy that adrenaline rush that comes out of primal fear, and these are some of the best locations in the world to experience it.

Creepiest Places: The LaLaurie Mansion

Creepiest Places Lalaurie Outside

Looks pretty harmless from the outside
Source: Wikimedia

Our obsession with serial killers is pretty evident. They are the worst that mankind has to offer so, naturally, they fascinate us. However, very rarely do they leave behind such a creepy legacy as the LaLaurie Mansion in New Orleans. For multiple decades in the 19th century, this was where wealthy Louisiana socialite Delphine LaLaurie engaged in the brutal torture and murder of her slaves.

Creepiest Places Lalaurie Night

Ok, it gets a little scary at night
Source: The Magazine

We’ll probably never know exactly how many people met a gruesome end in that house, but some claim it was in the hundreds. These kinds of homes often get demolished, but not so for this home. Not only is the LaLaurie Mansion still standing, it’s become a prominent New Orleans landmark. At one point, the home was even purchased by actor Nicolas Cage.

Creepiest Places Lalaurie Tour

Unsurprisingly, people say the mansion is haunted and offer ghost tours
Source: Blogspot

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How Income Can Affect Your SAT Score–And Future

Average SAT Scores By Family Income Graph

Unsurprisingly, there is a positive correlation between a family’s income and how well their child does on the SAT. While SAT and related test scores aren’t the sole determinants of an applicant’s admission to a university, the fact that one can predict with a fair degree of accuracy how well (or poorly) a student will do on a standardized test if provided with his or her family’s tax returns is fairly disconcerting in a country that considers itself to be an exemplar when it comes to equal opportunity.

5 Unsolved Serial Killings That Will Haunt You

Unsolved Serial Killings West Mesa Memorial

A police officer visits a memorial for the West Mesa victims. Source: Albuquerque Journal

Freeway Phantom

Unsolved Serial Killings DC

Source: Wikipedia

Beginning in the spring of 1971, only a year and a half after the civil rights riots, Washington, D.C.’s Freeway Phantom haunted the metropolitan area for 16 months, brutally killing six girls, ages 10 to 18. Police know that at least three of them suffered rape and all of them were strangled. Their bodies were found along roadways and freeways between D.C. and Maryland. All victims were black and it has been suggested by victims’ family members that the case would have received more media and police coverage had the victims been white.

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1924 Owens Valley Protests Foreshadow California’s Scary Drought Problems

Owens Valley Protests LA 1902

A dusty Los Angeles street in 1902 Source: Water Power

Even with its green lawns and swimming pools, Los Angeles―and Southern California―is a semi-desert. Dropping a major city into this climate with limited water resources seems ridiculous now, but when LA’s population began to boom in the nineteenth century, its leaders believed that the aquifer supplying the city would last.

William Mulholland became the ruthless first superintendent of the then-new Los Angeles Water Department, later the Department of Water and Power (DWP), and later had a famous LA street named after him. In an astonishingly legal and morally bankrupt move, he decided to tap the Owens River, 250 miles away, and bring it to the City of Angels. Eventually, LA drained the Owens Valley dry, but its residents weren’t going down without a fight.

Owens Valley Protests Mulholland

Ken Goldberg’s painting of William Mulholland Source: University Of California Berkeley

The river ended at Owens Lake, at 4,000-foot elevation. Since LA is at sea level, the water could go mostly downhill under its own power. The US Bureau of Reclamation promised Owens Valley farmers they’d build an irrigation system. Through underhanded, borderline-illegal tactics, Mulholland got the plan nixed.

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