Before Techies, There Were Hippies: Haight-Ashbury In 1967

haight ashbury 1967 intersection

The intersection of Haight and Ashbury, San Francisco in 1967. Source: Mashable

As American air raids wreaked havoc on Vietnamese soil in 1967, in San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury neighborhood it was the Summer of Love.

A series of natural and political events would transpire before Haight-Ashbury would become the epicenter of the “Free Love” mentality. It was one of the only areas spared from the fires sparked by the 1906 earthquakes, which meant that the neighborhood retained its charming Victorian architecture, if not its staunch sensibilities. Nevertheless, after the middle class left in the 1950s to relocate to the suburbs, Haight-Ashbury subsequently fell into disrepair.

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Housewives Before WW2: Women On The Cusp Of Transformation

american housewife 1941 plate hanging

Hanging a china plate as decoration while Tony plays. Source: Mashable

We’ve written before on the ways war has inspired countless technical innovations that we take for granted every day, but haven’t focused too much on the ways it has transformed the home and its accompanying gender roles. In this arena, one surprising “accomplishment” of World War II was the way it catalyzed the average American woman’s move from the home and to the marketplace, where she found remunerative work–and where she more often than not stayed.

Just two months before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, LIFE Magazine ran a piece by photographer William C. Shrout covering the duties of the typical, middle class American mother and housewife, a figure whose June Cleaver associations are becoming more mythical with each passing decade.

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The Moment 27 Years Of Wrongful Imprisonment Ends

40 Years In Jail

Kwame Ajamu, right, formerly known as Ronnie Bridgeman, is comforted by attorney Terry Gilbert Source: AP/Tony Dejak

At age 17, Ohio native Kwame Ajamu saw much of his future vanish. Ajamu, along with his brother and a friend, was convicted of murdering a money-order salesman in Cleveland. The boys, all of whom were under 21 at the time, were sentenced to death but later had their sentences commuted.

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