10 Interesting Things You Didn’t Know About American History

May 9, 2014
American History DC

Source: Pat Dollard

George Washington was the first President of the liberty-loving nation, and The Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776. Both of these comprise rather well-known events throughout the course of American history. But there’s a wealth of hidden history nuggets that you might not know about. Here are ten of them.

American History Declaration Of Independence

Source: When In Time

1. The Founding Fathers penned the first couple of drafts of the Declaration of Independence on hemp paper, since at the time at least 75 percent of all the world’s paper was made from cannabis hemp fiber. The democratic delegates eked out the document’s first and second drafts—completed on June 28th and July 2nd 1776, respectively—on Dutch hemp paper. The final document had a more official air, though, as it was printed on parchment.

{ Read The Rest Of This Post… }

Namibia’s Mysterious Fairy Circles

May 5, 2014

Lone Tree Fairy Circles Namibia

Most prominently found in Namibia, fairy circles are natural ‘bald spots’ whose formation is rather contentious. Some think that it’s the work of the sand termite, while others speculate that it is–as you might imagine–the work of aliens.

The Construction of Madison Square Garden In 1966

May 1, 2014

Construction Madison Square Garden

Officially opening its doors to the public in 1968, Madison Square Garden is the oldest and most active major sporting facility in New York City, and one of the busiest music arenas in the world. With a price tag of a cool $1.1 billion, it’s also thought to be one of the most expensive venues ever built.

An Amazing Vintage Photo Of Mardi Gras In New Orleans

April 29, 2014

Mardi Gras New Orleans 1938

Perhaps one of the only festivals in the world that overtly condones hedonism in the name of the Lord, a group of voluptuous men can be seen baring all to the camera–or as much as “all” would socially allow in the early 20th century–in 1938.

Women Of Hell’s Angels, 1965

April 25, 2014
Old Ladies Hells Angels 1965

Source: Time

The United States has had a rebellious streak from its inception, and its mid 20th century incarnation–Hell’s Angels—proves no exception. Photographer Bill Ray and writer Joe Bride described the leathered outlaws as a new breed of rebel that “absolutely despised everything that most Americans value and strive for. They rode their bikes, hung out in bars for days at a time, fought with anyone that messed with them. It was extraordinary to be around.”

And yet even within this rebellious sect, gender divisions bore a strong resemblance to more mainstream society. Of particular interest to the LIFE duo was the role that women played within the club. Women would come and go, and many of them were as young as teenagers. During Hell’s meetings, they would wait patiently in another room, not allowed to take part in the discussion.

The Many Faces Of United States Gun Culture

April 2, 2014

In 2013, British photographer Charles Ommanney went on a six-state tour of the United States in an attempt to shed light on American gun culture. Commissioned by the German magazine, Stern, Ommanney’s photos present an eye-opening vision where gun ownership has become normalized and an integral facet of so many people’s lives: fathers play with their children as a pistol hangs from their hips; assault rifles and handguns sprinkle the vanities of mothers; lily-white teens pose with their firearms as if showing off a corsage for a high school prom.

Prev Next 1 of 14
Gun Culture Family

The Baker family poses with their other family members outside a dilapidated gas station in Ashburn, Georgia.

Gun Culture Baby

Strapped with a baby and a handgun, Miami realtor Loigrand De Angelis poses with his most prized "possessions".

Gun Culture Living Room

Lindsay Makowski and her bulldog in Silver Spring, Maryland. Makowski bought her firearms after a bad relationship.

Gun Culture Outdoors

The Moffatt family poses with their weaponry in Overgaard, Arizona. If they look familiar to you, that's because they've been featured on National Geographic's "Doomsday Preppers".

Gun Culture Little Girls

The Moffatt girls (13 and 12 years old) pose with their pistols and assault rifles.

Gun Culture Obama

Representing the interesting niche of gun-owning Democrats, writer Dan Baum poses with his 19th century C96 Mauser.

Gun Culture Bedroom

Millicent Hunter relaxing with her pump-action shotgun in Fairfax, Virginia.

Gun Culture Cards

Lotion, perfume and guns drape Millicent Hunter's vanity in Fairfax, Virginia.

Gun Culture Wallpaper

16 year old Elizabeth Lamont from Virginia poses with one of her handguns (she owns two).

Gun Culture Pose

Dan Wilkins poses with his AR-15 at his home in Austin, Texas.

Gun Culture Shooting Range

Millicent Hunter (left) and her friends spend time together at a shooting range in Fairfax, Virginia.

Gun Culture Baby Father

Never far from his baby or his gun, Loigrand De Angelis plays with with his son in his Miami, Florida home.

Gun Culture Outdoors

Brian Moffatt poses with his gun (left), and attorney Marc Victor holds tight to his assault rifle outside his office in Phoenix, Arizona.

Gun Culture Suburbs

Ann Asenbauer in Katy, Texas. Asenbauer opted to purchase her gun after police took too long to respond to an incident.

The result is an unconventional narrative on American gun culture: in none of Ommanney’s shots did he seek to caricature or overly critique his subjects in a typical NRA bashing. Instead, Ommanney sought to simply present the intersection of fear, values and politics in its most distilled form: within the American home. Equal parts chilling and mystifying, more of Ommanney’s political and documentary photography can be found on his website.