This July 4th, Thank US Suffrage Movement Leaders For Your Independence

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National Woman’s Party officers gather for the 1920 Republican National Convention to fight for ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment Source: The Huffington Post

Many influential women paved the way for the Nineteenth Amendment, which became law on August 18, 1920.

Abigail Adams

Back in 1776, Abigail Adams sent a letter to her husband, John Adams, who would later become America’s second president. At the time, he was attending the Continental Congress, where wealthy colonists, all men, were deciding whether or not to declare independence from Great Britain. In the letter, Abigail urges him to allow women a place in the new nation’s government. Yet all the talk of “Oppressions…abuses and usurpations” in the Declaration of Independence did nothing to change the position of women, who were left with few rights, or that of slaves, who had none. It was an inherently unequal society ironically built on the concept of equality.

Suffrage Movement Abigail Adams

A young Abigail Adams Source: About

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The Jazz And Style Of 1940s Harlem

Harlem 1940

1940s Harlem. The Harlem of Malcolm X, of Duke Ellington, of Zora Neale Hurston. Prohibition is over, and African Americans are fighting a war at a time when they are still regarded as second-class citizens. The energy was palpable, as the northwestern corner of Manhattan was a petri dish for creatives, thinkers and activists whose legacy would largely shape the course of African American history in the 20th century.

Fishing For Change During The Great Depression

Fishing For Change Great Depression

Three boys scavenge peer down New York City grates for change in 1930. During the first years of the Depression, approximately 250,000 young people were homeless. As this photo suggests, one of the few constants in these kids’ lives was a sense of desperation.