The 20 Craziest Laws In The United States

Craziest Laws Body Vest

1. If you want to kill someone in New Jersey, you probably shouldn’t wear a body vest. In addition to the legal problem of, you know, killing someone, New Jersey law forbids an offender to use or wear “a body vest while engaged in the commission of, or an attempt to commit, or flight after committing or attempting to commit murder, manslaughter, robbery, sexual assault, burglary, kidnapping, criminal escape or assault.”

2. A law in Missouri bans the sale of yellow margarine. This prohibition dates back to the 19th century, and while it isn’t upheld, such a crime can smack the offender with a $500 fine and six months in the slammer if he or she dares peddle the imitation spread multiple times.

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What Remains Of The 1893 Chicago World’s Fair

Chicago Fair Ticket

Source: Blogspot

Up to the moment that the Chicago World’s Fair opened to the public on May 1, 1893, crews scrambled to replant landscaping that had been washed away in a torrential rain storm. Puddles drowned the newly sodded lawns and some paint was still wet, but to the eyes of that day’s fairgoers, it was nothing short of a photo finish. The few remaining pieces of the Fair dazzle today’s viewers just like they did over a century ago.

Rather than a simple map, enjoy UCLA’s three-dimensional recreation of the Fair:

In the nineteenth century, cities were filthy places. Factory pollution and dust clogged the air. So when fairgoers were greeted by the glimmering Court of Honor, nicknamed the White City, it seemed like they had been transported to another world. Overseeing the Fair’s design and construction, Daniel Burnham had the huge neoclassical buildings coated in soft white paint so that they would “glow” in the sunlight.

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The Intriguing History of the American Penny

American Pennies

Source: Wikipedia

Proving that no human idiosyncrasy is too obscure for a holiday, each year people celebrate Lucky Penny Day, a time to appreciate the good luck of finding a penny heads-up. When May 23rd rolls around, one can find people hunting for lucky pennies in the streets or even tossing a few coins to the ground to make good luck for others. And while these days many people consider the American penny to be an anachronistic waste, the one-cent coin has a colorful history that spans centuries.

Penny Art Abraham Lincoln

Source: Deviant Art

The History of the American Penny

In 1787, Congress issued the first iteration of the American penny, which was reportedly designed by none other than Benjamin Franklin himself. Referred to informally as the “Franklin” and eventually as “the Fugio cent,” this penny prominently featured the sayings “Mind Your Business” and “We Are One” along its sides. The 1787 copper coin also bore images of thirteen connected chain links to represent the original states. There are a reported 55 (slight) varieties of the Fugio cent.

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