The Most Fascinatingly Bizarre Footage Of A Tarantula Molting

April 14, 2014

In order to grow, tarantulas must shed their exoskeletons every one to two years–and even more so when they are younger. Like most humans who are about to undergo a major and often uncomfortable change, before molting tarantulas tend to appear sluggish and refuse food. The process can last anywhere from 45 minutes to over 12 hours. In this video, though, it happens in under five minutes.

Train Surfing: The Most Terrifying Anger Management Exercise Ever

April 12, 2014

Apartheid and the struggle against it have largely shaped the course of modern South African history. And in Katlehong, one of the key outposts of the anti-apartheid struggle, young South Africans continue to manifest their anger in a way you’d never expect: by train surfing. As one of the staff riders (local slang for the sport) says, train surfing offers itself as a physical release that is much less violent than robbing or beating others.

The Tiny Worlds Within London’s Streets

April 10, 2014

Match sticks, cigarettes and puddles are peppered throughout London’s vast sidewalks and street corners. Swapping blight for whimsy, these clever filmmakers have found inspiration–not ugliness–in them, and have since created this delightful video of the tiny worlds that might exist in the most unexpected of places.

Visualizing The Shapes Of Sound

April 8, 2014

Two objects–lycopodium powder and subwoofers–convene to create one astounding video of how sound “looks” and moves.

Think Sea Sponges And Coral Are Boring? Think Again.

April 6, 2014

Often thought of as merely colorful backdrops to complement more “exciting” marine life like sharks and stingrays, this high-magnification video portrays coral and sea sponges in a vibrant new light. Be sure to check out more of this videographer’s work at Micro Worlds Photography.

Farkas Zsolt Takes on Classic Art With Incredible 3D CG Work

April 5, 2014
Farkas Zsolt 3D CG Artwork

Source: CG Society

While the photo above might appear to be a snapshot of the Benczúr Gyula’s 1885 painting, Budavár visszavétele (Buda Repossession), it’s actually the work of 3D computer graphics (CG) artist Farkas Zsolt. What began as a challenge from his wife has evolved into a near-exact replica of the classic painting. Compare the original painting (below) with his 3D CG creation (above).

Original Painting of Battle of Buda

Source: Wikipedia

To create the CG 3D models, Zsolt first analyzed the painting’s composition and determined how the characters were positioned within the 3D space. Once placed within the program, he modelled each character with a full rig, meaning that each could be animated, and “painted them.” Despite the complexity and enormity of the project, Farkas Zsolt finished the entire picture in less than a few months.

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