The woman had no idea that a "hard mass" of lenses was lodged into her eyelid.
Contact Stack

BMJ

A 67-year-old woman was “shocked” to learn that she had 27 contact lenses stuck to her eyeball.

English doctors recently found the horrifying collection when the patient came in for a routine cataract surgery.

While prepping her, they found “a bluish foreign body,” which was actually a “hard mass” of 17 lenses stuck together, according to a report in the British Medical Journal.

The woman had had no idea that her lids had been crammed full of lenses, having believed that her discomfort was just a natural byproduct of old age.

It wasn’t — though her apparently failing memory which likely caused her to forget to take her contacts out 27 times is probably something she should get checked out.

“It was such a large mass,” Rupal Morgaria, a specialist trainee ophthalmologist who had seen the woman, told Optometry Today. “We were really surprised that the patient didn’t notice it because it would cause quite a lot of irritation while it was sitting there.”

After retrieving the stack that was “bound together by mucus,” the surgeon dug around some more with the help of a microscope and uncovered ten more separate lenses floating around in the woman’s socket.

The patient had “deep set eyes” and has been wearing contacts for 35 years.

When she came back for a check-up two weeks after the excess lenses had been removed, she reported feeling “a lot more comfortable.”

Though doctors said they had never seen this kind of contacts stash before, this is is not the first contact lenses horror story.

One woman contracted an eye-eating parasite from sleeping in her lenses and a boxer went blind in one eye after cleaning a lens in his mouth.

With these cautionary tales and a persistent phobia of touching my eyes (Ommetaphobia), I’ll personally be sticking to glasses.


Next, read about a doctor who fell in love with his patient and then lived with her corpse. Then, the zombie parasite that lives in fish eyeballs and controls their behavior.

Annie Garau
Annie is a NYC-based writer. For tips, write to [email protected]
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